Tomorrow's Doctor
We can't solve problems by using the same thinking which created them.
Read about how this all got started on the Huffington Post

All Visions For The 21st Century Physician
Children have a hard time self treating their Asthma because of physical limitations,a nd the lack of "fun" in doing so. We believe we have a solution to this problem - The FunHaler MDI Asthma...
— Carl Martin
Children have a hard time self treating their Asthma because of physical limitations,a nd the lack of "fun" in doing so. We believe we have a solution to this problem - The FunHaler MDI Asthma Inhaler Case for Children - http://igg.me/at/funhaler-prototype/x/6094733 . Help us bring this vision to life, and help some Asthmatic children in the process.
— Carl Martin
Educate and empower the physician to prevent illness and optimise health through diet and exercise measures. Proactive, not reactive healthcare system.
— Steffan Griffin
University of Birmingham
Educate and empower the physician to prevent illness and optimise health through diet and exercise measures. Proactive, not reactive healthcare system.
— Steffan Griffin
University of Birmingham
With strong foundations humanists, compassion for others, ability to adapt to changes in the sources of scientific information and with great dedication to service.
— Juan Robledo
Clinica Nova
With strong foundations humanists, compassion for others, ability to adapt to changes in the sources of scientific information and with great dedication to service.
— Juan Robledo
Clinica Nova
In order to identify the OPPORTUNITY to heal, one must understand the details that empower or undermine the nidus of dysfunction. Add to this that healing is an active adjustment that shifts the...
— Alex Spencer
University of Washington SOM
In order to identify the OPPORTUNITY to heal, one must understand the details that empower or undermine the nidus of dysfunction. Add to this that healing is an active adjustment that shifts the unhealthy momentum toward more healthy horizons, the physician must be embrace human frailty instead of shunning it. Health in the modern world reeks with the subtle allure of pleasurable poisons that derail our collective desire for vibrant futures. To effect change then the future physician must be fluent in the languages of modern life. We must be sophisticated enough to internalize the wondrous torrent of knowledge emanating from medicinal science yet savvy enough negotiate economic reality. Finally, after all content and pressures collide in the physicians mind, we must maintain our tender humanity to reach our patients on easy footing igniting their passion to reach that clouded summit of health.
— Alex Spencer
University of Washington SOM
The 21st century physician will need to change their thinking to embrace the complexity of our world and be a leader to improve the value of care for the people we call patients. This means...
— Bruce Ramshaw
Transformative Crae Institute
The 21st century physician will need to change their thinking to embrace the complexity of our world and be a leader to improve the value of care for the people we call patients. This means working on diverse teams that include the patient and family, functioning as equals on the team and applying complexity science to learn and improve (currently known as clinical quality improvement). This includes defining, measuring and improving the value of the entire cycle of care for definable patient groups and problems. This will require a fundamental change in the system structure for how we care for patients.
— Bruce Ramshaw
Transformative Crae Institute
Having been a young investigator in the Princeton PS-OC (www.princeton.edu/psoc) in both a physics group and a cancer biology group, I want the physician who treats me tomorrow to be comfortable...
— David Liao, PhD
Analyst, UCSF; Instructor, lookatphysics.com
Having been a young investigator in the Princeton PS-OC (www.princeton.edu/psoc) in both a physics group and a cancer biology group, I want the physician who treats me tomorrow to be comfortable using mathematical modeling to evaluate candidate treatment strategies. I also want her/him to be supported by a health care reimbursement infrastructure that rewards practitioners and patients for prevention.
— David Liao, PhD
Analyst, UCSF; Instructor, lookatphysics.com
The U.S. has the best crisis care in the world yet and is horrible in most if not all other aspects of patient health. Our focus needs to be changed to one of wellness as opposed to magic bullet...
— Michael McKellar DC
National University of Health Sciences
The U.S. has the best crisis care in the world yet and is horrible in most if not all other aspects of patient health. Our focus needs to be changed to one of wellness as opposed to magic bullet repair options. Tomorrow's Physician will be an educator of nutrition, stress reduction and exercise.
— Michael McKellar DC
National University of Health Sciences
Clearly the 21st Century physicians must address the health care challenges today while preparing to deliver the care that the new technologies will facilitate. These doctors will be focused on...
— Thomas C. Royer, MD
Partner in Royer-Maddox-Herron Advisors
Clearly the 21st Century physicians must address the health care challenges today while preparing to deliver the care that the new technologies will facilitate. These doctors will be focused on maintaining health through population management, and see sick-care as only one component of their services. This transition must begin with the education process. Future medical students will be trained in a 6 year program, patterned after the European and Mexico systems. By entering medical school directly out of high school, they will save money and time. This accelerated plan can be accomplished recognizing that much of the premedical courses and predominately memorization courses early in medical school are not useful or necessary today. In addition, the students will go year round, leaving sufficient time for practical work in primary care areas where they will hone their diagnostic skills, often missing today as the students are becoming increasingly dependent on CAT Scans and MRIs. They will also have time to take some meaningful electives, and dabble in clinical and bench research if they so desire. They will be taught to become comfortable using treatment protocol based on evidenced-based medicine, thereby practicing a higher quality and safer brand of medicine. The unnecessary and duplicative studies being done at present hopefully will also be eliminated, in turn, lowering the present unaffordable cost structure. Because teaming skills will be essential in their practice, they will be taught in part and have the opportunity to train side-by-side administrators and nurses. Although the students will be exposed to a much higher level of technologies permitting more care to be rendered in clinical settings outside the acute hospital, they will be taught that the patient must be in the center of all their practice decisions. And because the healthcare industry will continue to evolve, moving toward even more population health, preventive medicine, integration of successful alternative medicine protocols, enhanced end-of-life treatment plans supported by growing hospice and palliative care programs, telemedicine, and even hospitals-at home, the students will be taught how to adapt to change quickly and be committed upon graduation to continuous life-long learning. In the end, the training hopefully will look significantly different, but the successful residents of the future which these changes produce will still need to be committed to and be passionate about caring for people.This requirement will never change!
— Thomas C. Royer, MD
Partner in Royer-Maddox-Herron Advisors
WHAT IS A GOOD DOCTOR? AND HOW DO WE MAKE ONE? By Pepi Granat, MD Our patients -- not we -- are the ones to answer the question, “What is a good doctor?” Their verdict rings clear every day in...
— Pepi Granat, MD
Universtiy of Miami (Voluntary Professor of...
WHAT IS A GOOD DOCTOR? AND HOW DO WE MAKE ONE? By Pepi Granat, MD Our patients -- not we -- are the ones to answer the question, “What is a good doctor?” Their verdict rings clear every day in the clinics and hospitals. They vote with their feet, their loyalty, their love, and even their willingness to heal. We receive that magnetic transmission and become better doctors because of their faith in us. Our trust in our patients fuels intellectual and compassionate energies toward a lovely, symmetrical synergy that is healing and inspirational. Good doctors are born, not made. Just as Michelangelo understood the relationship of his choice of marble to his final sculpture, so we must realize that the good doctors are cooing in their cribs now, waiting to be delivered to the bedside, only molded, not made by us. Michelangelo believed that in every stark block of pure white marble a sculpted figure was trapped, waiting to be released. He trekked far to the Carrara Mountains to select and transport tenderly his chosen piece. Without talent and work the David and the Pieta would have remained in the marble, just as without nurture and modeling our gifted physicians will not burst forth. At birth, good doctors are endowed with superior capacity for memory, not just for science and facts retained, ready to think about the ramifications of a complex case, but to remember names and faces they’ve seen, nuances day to day, management modifications, resources in communities, and where to look these up should their innate memory-talent fail them. They are blessed with superior reasoning ability to put together pieces of the puzzles of diagnosis and treatment. They are capable of emotional intelligence: the ability to gauge another human’s feelings. They are gifted with temperamental qualities that are often oppositional, yet melded in one individual: patience with efficiency, strength with compassion, dispassion with warmth, toughness with love. We must find these special people and make them our doctors. We can fill their empty slate. We have tried in good faith to do this through our schooling and entry procedures, but have probably failed at least as often as we have succeeded. Picking only compassionate people, or only highly intelligent or prepared people will not do: they will not have the other qualities. As Rumpelstiltskin scoured the countryside until he discovered the spinner who could turn flax into gold, so we must magically mine our human quarries to uncover the good doctors lurking in the children of tomorrow.
— Pepi Granat, MD
Universtiy of Miami (Voluntary Professor of Family Medicine)
Heals and/or comforts the sick in person and through any one of a number of connection channels (chat, video chat, text, email, phone) all in a way that makes a balanced healthy life possible for...
— Dike Drummond MD
www.TheHappyMD.com
Heals and/or comforts the sick in person and through any one of a number of connection channels (chat, video chat, text, email, phone) all in a way that makes a balanced healthy life possible for the doctor and their family. Healthcare does not need "Creative Destruction" nearly as much as Burnout does. With 1 in 3 docs suffering from symptomatic burnout on any given office day, worldwide regardless of specialty ... the delivery mechanism is ill and fading fast. Doctors don't have to be the canary in the coal mine of healthcare. There are hundreds of ways to lower stress that can be incorporated into the 21st Century Doctor. If they are NOT ... you are headed for a Unionized work force because doctors will have to protect themselves somehow - IMHO (and it does not have to be this way at all)
— Dike Drummond MD
www.TheHappyMD.com
Tomorrow's Doctor will have a real sense of the bigger picture. Technology that enhances care will not be ignored to develop skills that are less objective. They will not focus solely on how to...
— Stesha
Stanford Medical School
Tomorrow's Doctor will have a real sense of the bigger picture. Technology that enhances care will not be ignored to develop skills that are less objective. They will not focus solely on how to treat or prevent diseases but also on how the healthcare system works and how we can do it better.
— Stesha
Stanford Medical School
Knowledgable, compassionate, technologically efficient, and able to communicate easily
— Richard Lin
Weill Cornell Medical College
Knowledgable, compassionate, technologically efficient, and able to communicate easily
— Richard Lin
Weill Cornell Medical College
Doctors are knowledge managers. The doctors of the 21st century will need to know when to rely on their human skills and when to rely on technology. They will have to be prepared to overrule their...
— Winston Liauw
St George Hospital, Sydney
Doctors are knowledge managers. The doctors of the 21st century will need to know when to rely on their human skills and when to rely on technology. They will have to be prepared to overrule their patients' smartphones #scanadu. The doctors of the 21st century need to be taught at medical school the things they don't teach in medical school now - you'll find some of these on my blog http://winstonliauw.com/
— Winston Liauw
St George Hospital, Sydney
Tomorrows physicians need to be different, not the "accidental leaders" that some clinicians are, but well educated drivers of health care change. They need to be educated in finance, because...
— Marcus Friedrch
North Shore Health System, NY
Tomorrows physicians need to be different, not the "accidental leaders" that some clinicians are, but well educated drivers of health care change. They need to be educated in finance, because finance is what drives most of the health care delivery. A doctor who can not read or maintain a viable budget needs to be educated.
— Marcus Friedrch
North Shore Health System, NY
Integrative Medicine
— Manu Pradeesh
The Medical Park
Integrative Medicine
— Manu Pradeesh
The Medical Park
A 21st century physician...sees each patient as whole and complete. Physicians of tomorrow will invite patients to co-create their desired healing environment, internally and externally. Patients...
— Michael McPherson
SCNM
A 21st century physician...sees each patient as whole and complete. Physicians of tomorrow will invite patients to co-create their desired healing environment, internally and externally. Patients will be viewed from the perspective that they are already healed. From this perspective, both patient and doctor with together participate in the healing modality most fit to obtain wellness.
— Michael McPherson
SCNM
My vision for a 21st century physician is one who looks beyond the superficial symptoms and attempts to treat the root cause of illness in the most natural way possible. The physician demonstrates...
— Amelia Wachtin
Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine
My vision for a 21st century physician is one who looks beyond the superficial symptoms and attempts to treat the root cause of illness in the most natural way possible. The physician demonstrates caring and compassion. Doctors need to be educators to patients and empower them to live a healthier life. Big pharma is not the answer. Ties need to be cut between the medical system and pharma as there are too many conflicts of interest. We need real sustainable healthcare. It is time that the conventional system broaden their scope and accept alternative medicine as a profession and work together for the best interest of the patient. We can change things, it just takes people that care!
— Amelia Wachtin
Boucher Institute of Naturopathic Medicine
I am going to be a Naturopathic Pediatrician that focuses on fertility, prenatal health, and well baby/family health. By helping families achieve a healthy pregnancy and have healthy babies I...
— Natasha Cridler
Bastyr University San Diego
I am going to be a Naturopathic Pediatrician that focuses on fertility, prenatal health, and well baby/family health. By helping families achieve a healthy pregnancy and have healthy babies I believe we can make a healthier community.
— Natasha Cridler
Bastyr University San Diego
Naturopathic Doctor! Prevention of disease and maintenance of health by using wellness, lifestyle, diet, nutrition, exercise, and relaxation treatment strategies!
— allison
Bastyr University
Naturopathic Doctor! Prevention of disease and maintenance of health by using wellness, lifestyle, diet, nutrition, exercise, and relaxation treatment strategies!
— allison
Bastyr University
They work hard to address the underlying causes of dis-ease instead of merely masking the symptoms.
— Yonsen
They work hard to address the underlying causes of dis-ease instead of merely masking the symptoms.
— Yonsen
A 21st century physician works with their patient to attain optimal health. They don't prescribe pharmaceuticals, but work through lifestyle, diet, and self-awareness to right imbalances. M.D.s do...
— e.m.
A 21st century physician works with their patient to attain optimal health. They don't prescribe pharmaceuticals, but work through lifestyle, diet, and self-awareness to right imbalances. M.D.s do a fabulous job in acute health situations but they are lacking in preventative medicine. Recognizing N.D.s as valuable members of the healthcare system will fill the void, providing people with the tools to avoid chronic diseases that are preventable.
— e.m.
Tomorrow's physician is a naturopathic physician. They are trained at 4 year medical schools so are able to diagnose conditions effectively yet approach treatments from a holistic stance, knowing...
— Ashley
SCNM
Tomorrow's physician is a naturopathic physician. They are trained at 4 year medical schools so are able to diagnose conditions effectively yet approach treatments from a holistic stance, knowing that symptoms can be due to many causes or one cause. Tomorrow's physician, a naturopathic physician, knows that chronic disease can be treated through lifestyle changes, nutrition, well-researched natural treatments as well as effective empirical treatments (like acupuncture, which has been around for thousands of years) in which research is just starting to demonstrate what we've know for a long time. Tomorrow's physician, a naturopathic physician, meets their patient where they're at and supports the patient through making difficult lifestyle changes instead of dictating treatments based on algorithms that don't take the patients motivation or ability to change into account. Tomorrow's physician, a naturopathic physician, takes time to listen to their patient and may spend anywhere from 30 minutes to an hour with one person instead of rushing them through an 8 minute visit. Tomorrow's physician, a naturopathic physician, gets people well and moves them in the direction of health instead of palliating while they move towards more disease and sickness. Tomorrow's physician is a naturopathic physician.
— Ashley
SCNM
I want to educate people on the connection between lifestyle and health; give them the tools to feel the empowerment of change in their hands; I want them to understand the norm is not lethargy,...
— Jenny
Pre-med ND
I want to educate people on the connection between lifestyle and health; give them the tools to feel the empowerment of change in their hands; I want them to understand the norm is not lethargy, depression, aches and pains but waking up energetic, healthy, and happy. The future doctor enables the patients to take an active role in their healing and health.
— Jenny
Pre-med ND
I want to educate people on the connection between lifestyle and health; give them the tools to feel the empowerment of change in their hands; I want them to understand the norm is not lethargy,...
— Jenny
Bastyr
I want to educate people on the connection between lifestyle and health; give them the tools to feel the empowerment of change in their hands; I want them to understand the norm is not lethargy, depression, aches and pains but waking up energetic, healthy, and happy.
— Jenny
Bastyr
Together with 17 colleagues from around the world we just co-edited a book on this very topic - "The question of competence: Reconsidering medical education in the 21st century". There are 7...
— Brian Hodges MD PhD
University of Toronto, University Health Network
Together with 17 colleagues from around the world we just co-edited a book on this very topic - "The question of competence: Reconsidering medical education in the 21st century". There are 7 terrific essays that deal directly with your question. It's from Cornell Press. http://www.cornellpress.cornell.edu/book/?GCOI=80140100474510
— Brian Hodges MD PhD
University of Toronto, University Health Network
Naturopathic medicine concentrates on whole-patient wellness; the medicine is tailored to the patient and emphasizes prevention and self-care. Naturopathic medicine attempts to find the...
— Adrian Quintanilla
Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine &...
Naturopathic medicine concentrates on whole-patient wellness; the medicine is tailored to the patient and emphasizes prevention and self-care. Naturopathic medicine attempts to find the underlying cause of the patient's condition rather than focusing solely on symptomatic treatment. The doctor of the future is already here.
— Adrian Quintanilla
Southwest College of Naturopathic Medicine & Health Sciences
A team player in providing care and leading community and policy change. One who practices compassionate care with a depth of medical knowledge and breadth of understanding encompassing social...
— Julia Chang
UCLA SOM
A team player in providing care and leading community and policy change. One who practices compassionate care with a depth of medical knowledge and breadth of understanding encompassing social determinants of health.
— Julia Chang
UCLA SOM
I had the privilege to serve on a medical school admissions board starting as a 2nd year med student. The challenge of schools in the current environment is to use as many objective criteria as...
— Dr. Josh
US Navy
I had the privilege to serve on a medical school admissions board starting as a 2nd year med student. The challenge of schools in the current environment is to use as many objective criteria as possible to maximize fairness of selection, while not overlooking the role of personality, motivation, and behavior in the provision of patient care. This is a delicate balance. Schools want to know "Do they have the intellectual goods to pass monthly exams, and ultimately Steps 1&2?" as well as "Would I want this person to be my doctor?" Once admitted, students hardly breathe a sigh of relief, until they are subjected to immediate angst over residency selection. This determines not only one's future salary, but also one's physical location, amount of free time, and level of fulfillment practicing medicine for the next 30 years or so. What goes into residency selection? Residency program directors agree: board scores and rotation grades. How to do well? Memorize and recall information. To me, one way to limit the inherent problem of physicians becoming "regurgitative databases" in lieu of compassionate creative thinkers is to allow entrance and medical school exams (or at least a portion of them) to be conducted much like the current practice of medicine: open book. OK, I really mean open internet. The physician of the 21st century is the one that can FIND, INTERPRET, and APPLY the most current, relevant, robust data available. Furthermore he/she also must be able to turn around and persuasively communicate their findings in layman's terms to patients. To summarize: I say we reject the stressed-out, competitive memorizer/regurgitator, and instead embrace the communicative hunter-gatherer/interpreter.
— Dr. Josh
US Navy
Tomorrow's doctor is today's citizen, patient or carer who wishes to build a Partnership of Trust between patient and clinician, inside their own healthcare organisation but also to build...
— Dr Amir Hannan
Haughton Thornley Medical Centres, England...
Tomorrow's doctor is today's citizen, patient or carer who wishes to build a Partnership of Trust between patient and clinician, inside their own healthcare organisation but also to build relationships with other organisations too and with the patient, their family and the community they serve.They put the patient at the centre but support each other to meet tomorrow's challenges and the day after when they once again become patients, carers and citizens again.They learn from the past, listen to the present including the patient and plan for the future together. We work together to build a future together shaping tomorrow's doctor, tomorrow's patient, tomorrow's carer and tomorrow's manager.
— Dr Amir Hannan
Haughton Thornley Medical Centres, England National Health Service. www.htmc.co.uk
Doctors of the future should receive a multidisciplinary education that integrates medicine, psichology (cognitive-behavioral therapy), cooking, agriculture, sociology, anthropology, exercise...
— INIGO
Doctors of the future should receive a multidisciplinary education that integrates medicine, psichology (cognitive-behavioral therapy), cooking, agriculture, sociology, anthropology, exercise physiology, etc, in order to view and understand their patients as a whole, not as a mere symptom.
— INIGO
A 21st century physician should be nimble with mobile technology and history-taking. On the primary care inpatient side: As Big Data and EHRs become smarter, physicians will need to reference...
— Ray Lorenzoni
University of Connecticut
A 21st century physician should be nimble with mobile technology and history-taking. On the primary care inpatient side: As Big Data and EHRs become smarter, physicians will need to reference lab values and think about patient management strategies less and less. Instead the physicians of tomorrow, should be able to take efficient, complete histories from patients and then cross-reference algorithmic differential and patient management software on their mobile devices to maximize error-free decisions. When done correctly, patients will have more meaningful interactions with their physicians and physicians will be more accurate and effective with their treatments. On the primary care outpatient side: The future physician's expertise with technology and patient culture will become important in the struggle to prevent illness. PCPs will need to act as the guardian of patient health, organizing vast amounts of disparate clinical data from various sources and translating it into a focused preventive and maintenance care plans for their patients. Further, thoroughly knowing one's patients and their culture will allow the PCP of the future to most effectively execute such plans based on the most up-to-date EBM guidelines and continuity with the local resources available. Lastly, on the specialty care side: Although it will always be required, expensive specialty care will be minimized through preventive medicine techniques and optimized chronic disease management as described above. As is shown in research on healthy elderly individuals, death becomes less protracted, burdensome, and costly. In the end, everyone dies, and palliative care will have a prominent role in our society, allowing for a much more honorable and humane treatment of death than is true of medicine's current focus on the length of life instead of the quality of life. Through the expert integration of technology and empathy, the future physician's focus will be more purely on the well-being of the patient, not on the minute details of a disease. After all, there is not a cure for every disease, and those cures that do exist are useless if your patient cannot comply or dies in the process.
— Ray Lorenzoni
University of Connecticut
Americans maintain a fond respect for the classic image of the family physician, making house calls with black handbag in tow.  Yet, health care and systems innovation drives forward with...
— Aaron George, DO
Duke University Hospital
Americans maintain a fond respect for the classic image of the family physician, making house calls with black handbag in tow.  Yet, health care and systems innovation drives forward with technologic advancement, team and leadership modeling, along with a host of other skills and competencies. Physicians must be proactive and prepared leaders who are ready to step into this changing health care environment and both initiate and adapt to change.  Residencies across the the country are undergoing curricular and cultural shifts to meet these needs.    The goal for the future of medicine will be to maintain the classic and recognized historical image of the physician in concert with the goals and responsibilities of the adaptive health care world of tomorrow.  In essence, while we will always be able to carry our traditional black handbags, we must constantly search for opportunity to fill them with new skills and tools.  In this way, we can best unite patient expectations with quality care.   New "tools" in the next generation handbag include population health management, flexible usage of technology, advocacy, teamwork and communication.  Programs have already begun to develop specific aims to address areas such as (1) community engagement; (2) Adaptable integration of technology; (3) Awareness and involvement in active advocacy; (4) Responding to change; and (5) Team dynamics. Today’s residents need new skills to excel in tomorrow’s health care system. As we transform from a reactive system designed for acute care to a proactive one capable of managing complex chronic disease, graduate medical education must find ways to teach emerging competencies that are not fully mastered by even the most experienced clinicians. The next generation of physicians must not only provide outstanding patient care at the bedside, but also be capable of simultaneously managing entire populations through more than direct interaction. This marriage of micro and macro, the ability to see and navigate patient care on a larger context, will be crucial in containing runaway costs while maximizing patient outcomes.  A paradigmatic shift is at hand: the medical world has recently been presented with progress and innovation through abrupt disruption of the modern model.  Along these lines, MedPAC has laid out recommendations in their June 2010 report to Congress to modify GME payment schemes to create incentive toward just this sort of health care development at the residency level. There is some indication that MedPAC will go even further in more specific terms for these recommendations in their coming reports.   Each and every one of our patients now carries a device that contains more information with the stroke of a few keys, than all the textbooks we read in training.  We are no longer purveyors of information, but rather intuitive and experienced interpreters for our patients. This change empowers us into the role of patient facilitator. We no longer need reside in a world of regurgitation, but rather we can be an intuitive examiner that arrives on the scene to decipher information and make recommendations.   The modern physician is called to provide twenty-first century health care upon the foundation of twentieth-century training. Long gone are the days of house calls and the autonomy of the solo practitioner with an isolated patient population. Today's physician trainees enter a world of teamwork and collaboration in health care delivery. The growing demand for primary care coupled with our aging population mean that physicians can no longer care for their patients within their silos. To meet the needs to tomorrow, we must serve as leaders of multidisciplinary teams and continue to decentralize certain responsibilities. We have seen the positive impact of this team based model within patient-centered medical homes, but we are still only scratching the surface of what is possible. Further, we must continue to engage trainees in systems development and quality improvement.  We should also look to continue to find ways to balance service with education in the longitudinal structure of residency programs. These goals will continue to streamline and advance the process of developing a successful and productive physician in modern health care. The kind of doctor that is best for his patients, his community, and his profession. But these changes cannot happen within medical education alone. There are countless physicians in their early to mid-careers that should develop new skills to adapt to the needs of tomorrow. We cannot afford to wait for an entirely new cohort of physicians. To truly transform family medicine, we must bring opportunities to all physicians interested in adding these skills to their black handbag.
— Aaron George, DO
Duke University Hospital
The 21st Century physician should be the leader of a multidisciplinary team who enters into a PARTNERSHIP with the patient. In this age of globalization and rapid technological advancement, there...
— Brian D. Southern
Cleveland Clinic
The 21st Century physician should be the leader of a multidisciplinary team who enters into a PARTNERSHIP with the patient. In this age of globalization and rapid technological advancement, there is no role for the paternalistic, lone ranger physician. Yet the fundamentals of practicing good medicine -- listening to the patient, utilizing an evidence-based and scientifically sound approach to accurately diagnose and treat, and doing no harm -- remain as important today as ever.
— Brian D. Southern
Cleveland Clinic
As a licensed naturopathic physician in the Portland, Oregon area, I feel strongly that the physician of the 21st century should have a focus on prevention of disease. Chronic diseases such as...
— Kimberley Horner, ND
As a licensed naturopathic physician in the Portland, Oregon area, I feel strongly that the physician of the 21st century should have a focus on prevention of disease. Chronic diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular disease, and cancer are overwhelming our healthcare system, leading to the frustration of both patients and physicians. With the focus on solving most chronic disease through the use of pharmaceuticals rather than seriously promoting diet and lifestyle changes, we are creating illness rather than true health, because the cause of disease is rarely addressed. We spend twice as much as other developed countries on heathcare and still somehow have remarkably poor outcomes. If our primary purpose is to make money off the sick, then our system is working very well; people are very sick and other people are making a boatload of money "taking care" of them. However, if our primary purpose is to make people healthy, we as physicians won't make as much money, but we will, in my opinion, actually be doing our jobs. We have spent quite a bit of money on nutritional research over the years, but does information that ever reach the patient? Does it ever reach a doctor? Does it ever reach a medical student? Are doctors ever trained to care about nutrition? A truly healthy diet and lifestyle are the foundation of health and longevity and the only path to a sustainable heathcare system. I believe that the public should have access to the full range of therapies, from surgery, radiation, chemotherapy,and pharmaceuticals to nutritional therapies, a healthy food supply, and the information they need from their physicians about healthy lifestyle so that they can make better decisions for themselves. I firmly believe that physicians of the 21st century should be extensively trained in and deeply focused on the prevention of the major diseases that plague us in the 21st century. Otherwise we will not be meeting the challenges of our time.
— Kimberley Horner, ND
"The traditional classroom model where one professor lectures to a room of over 100 students is changing." This change is being made right now, led by students, at Brown University. The...
— Ted
Brown University
"The traditional classroom model where one professor lectures to a room of over 100 students is changing." This change is being made right now, led by students, at Brown University. The Brown Med Notes Collective is a collaborative, student-driven learning service at Alpert Medical School focused on increasing studying efficiency while increasing students' free time. At small group of students at our school create cloud-based, student-oriented lecture notes for our entire class, making special effort to organize, synthesize, and explain information to make it easier to understand on the first exposure. By distributing notes that are in "ready-to-learn" format, we reduce the time medical students spend processing raw information, organizing charts, and clarifying poorly explained points. In doing so we encourage healthier, more efficient studying habits while also increasing free-time --- leading to happier students who are more able to pursue their interests outside of the classroom. The concept of the "living document" is what sets the Notes Collective apart from other traditional note taking services. After notes are created by a member of our team, we use a central online document system where all members of the class are able to add to, comment on, and fix errors within any given set of lecture notes. As edits are continually made, each lecture's notes becomes progressively more refined and easier to study from before the exam. We think that the Notes Collective program highlights the core principles of an educational system that will make successful 21st Century Physicians. Collaboration and interactiveness are at the heart of our service, inspiring students to work with one another towards a common goal from which we can all benefit. We think that medical students can be some of the most creative innovators out there, whether it be in the classroom, the community, or abroad. Bringing them together, giving them more free time, and making learning an interactive, stimulating process are tangible benefits of a movement that will create tomorrow's doctor.
— Ted
Brown University
As a second year medical student, I find myself often frustrated at how creativity is stifled amidst the mountains of facts and details we must memorize, many of which will never prove useful. The...
— Faith
Brown
As a second year medical student, I find myself often frustrated at how creativity is stifled amidst the mountains of facts and details we must memorize, many of which will never prove useful. The future of medical education should shift away from minutia and start incorporating more interdisciplinary team work: students of behavioral sciences, economic disparities, and social work should be close allies with medical students as health professionals are under increasing pressure to change patients' behavior towards healthy lifestyles and chronic illness management. Doctors are not being trained enough on how to promote medication adherence, to council alcohol and smoking cessation, or to motivate weight loss, and it is no surprise when they are frustrated when a 20 minute visit does not produce the desired results. We need to focus our efforts on how to help patients achieve a healthy lifestyle as the chronic illnesses of a sedentary life are dominating the modern America. All options should be on the table, including transforming the traditional office visit into a deeper, more effective relationship.
— Faith
Brown
The economic and political realities that will define medicine’s practice environment in the United States during the coming decades are difficult to predict, but the competencies and qualities...
— S. Lee Ware
University of Kentucky College of Medicine
The economic and political realities that will define medicine’s practice environment in the United States during the coming decades are difficult to predict, but the competencies and qualities that will define the successful physician are far clearer. 21st century physicians must be habitual life-long learners to stay abreast of translational breakthroughs and technological innovations. Physicians must understand the scientific method and appreciate the role of skeptical, critical reasoning in evaluating the medical claims made by allied industries. Physicians must be familiar with the health systems landscape and prepared to adapt as it's reshaped by ever-evolving healthcare policy. Physicians must be capable of ethical reasoning and comfortable with making informed, often consequential, decisions. Physicians must be prepared to incorporate public health strategies and emphasize preventive care in their practices, regardless of specialty, in recognition of the environmental, cultural, and socioeconomic determinants of health. Physicians must be clear communicators with their peers and patients, and competent team leaders. Perhaps least quantifiable but eminently important, clinical physicians must be able to convey compassion, empathy, and sensitivity to their patients while acting as trustworthy guides, advocates, and catalysts for health.
— S. Lee Ware
University of Kentucky College of Medicine
Doctors should be compassionate . We are doctors to change the world to the best , Not to make it Worse . Can we save our fellow Humans without Thinking about Money ? Free Healthcare worldwide...
— Ali Latife
Doctors should be compassionate . We are doctors to change the world to the best , Not to make it Worse . Can we save our fellow Humans without Thinking about Money ? Free Healthcare worldwide that's a Vision I would Like to a part of if someday . Ali latife - Libya .
— Ali Latife
I think health care providers, no matter what field, should look to treat the person as a whole and should seek and treat the underlining CAUSE of the persons symptoms and not just the symptoms...
— Tiffany Mass
Los Angeles College of Chiropractic
I think health care providers, no matter what field, should look to treat the person as a whole and should seek and treat the underlining CAUSE of the persons symptoms and not just the symptoms themselves. They should also continually educate themselves with the most up to date information so they can better treat and educate their patients. Knowledge is power.
— Tiffany Mass
Los Angeles College of Chiropractic
21st century physicians bring a wealth of experience, beyond science and rote memorization, to their practices. They look to other fields to create innovation within their own and are intensely...
— Briah Fischer
Tulane University
21st century physicians bring a wealth of experience, beyond science and rote memorization, to their practices. They look to other fields to create innovation within their own and are intensely curious about the world around them. They prioritize their patients' needs and think of them as more than just their medical history. Above all, 21st century physicians are collaborators and seek to inspire and support the young scholars, artists, techies, athletes and scientists aspiring to enter the medical field one day.
— Briah Fischer
Tulane University
I will be among the 2% in the profession of medicine, African American women are small in number and combined with other underrepresented minority groups breaking double digits must be priority in...
— Katherine
I will be among the 2% in the profession of medicine, African American women are small in number and combined with other underrepresented minority groups breaking double digits must be priority in a nation that is growing rapidly in diversity. Reaching young and not so young people with tools, resources and mentors to achieve success in the long trajectory of medical education and training will shape a more promising future for the 21st century doctor. Here's a short list of a mix skills: • global thinker • team player/collaborator • educator • leader • humanities expertise While education, research and clinical care the patient-centered approach also requires advocates who are trained to move health in all policies. While our healthcare system is broken inequality in the fabric of our lives is unhealthy. Future physicians can champion and lead efforts at changing the landscape of where we live, work and pray and play for healthier living. Medical schools and all specialties should require that the intern year be dedicated in part to training young physicians as health coaches with incentives for trainees and institutions to shift from a disease-oriented to a health approach especially among the most vulnerable populuations. On final note, I technology may help our cause we all have a digital footprint that can help other find others find their path into medicine as well as move patients to healthier lives.
— Katherine
My vision is one which practices a healing art/science (be they an MD, DO, DC, PT, NP, ND, etc.) and is able to offer legit treatment in putting the patient's best interest at heart. There is no...
— John Hosten
Self/Innovative Sports Medicine
My vision is one which practices a healing art/science (be they an MD, DO, DC, PT, NP, ND, etc.) and is able to offer legit treatment in putting the patient's best interest at heart. There is no discrimination (undue - certainly every profession has their problems, especially in my own (chiropractic ))among providers that practice proper healthcare that is and has shown to be effective, that promotes preventative health which includes proper diet, exercise, and anything that allows for the public to better care for themselves. As a result, the need for insurance rates are lowered, the need for crisis intervention is curbed (diabetes, obesity, etc. and related matters). Ethics, integrity, morality are all upheld in the highest both in physician training (our schools) and practice. Finally, a modern physician will crave to never stop learning, not merely as a requirement for their license, but as a means to better treat our fellow man.
— John Hosten
Self/Innovative Sports Medicine
Using technology, we have the opportunity to reach and treat our patients in a new way and on their terms. No longer does the patient have to "go to the doctor to figure out that they need to go...
— Ben Green, MD
Carena
Using technology, we have the opportunity to reach and treat our patients in a new way and on their terms. No longer does the patient have to "go to the doctor to figure out that they need to go the doctor". We've moved to an era where treating patients on the doctors' terms is no longer the answer and I think that's exciting and best for our patients.
— Ben Green, MD
Carena
Able to communicate with patients and with Allied Health Professionals in her group/team in multiple different formats (email, text, phone, written formats, social media, and person to person) for...
— Alisa ML Hideg, MD, FAAFP
Group Health Cooperative
Able to communicate with patients and with Allied Health Professionals in her group/team in multiple different formats (email, text, phone, written formats, social media, and person to person) for coordination and cooperation in health care, preventive medicine, and education. Aware of the circumstances in individual lives and in her community that interfere with good health and willing to take action in ways that will make a difference in the long term.
— Alisa ML Hideg, MD, FAAFP
Group Health Cooperative
a 21st century physician: works for their patients and themselves, not health insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies. practices by the Hippocratic Oath. has the patients best...
— faith
AAAOM's brilliant doctors
a 21st century physician: works for their patients and themselves, not health insurance companies and pharmaceutical companies. practices by the Hippocratic Oath. has the patients best interests primarily in mind, not just covering their a** legally. is educated & open-minded about alternative treatments.
— faith
AAAOM's brilliant doctors
The only option, in my opinion, is to change the paradigm of medicine from tertiary care to primary prevention. Our system spends billions treating chronic disease, but will not pay doctors to...
— Brian Anderson
National University of Health Sciences
The only option, in my opinion, is to change the paradigm of medicine from tertiary care to primary prevention. Our system spends billions treating chronic disease, but will not pay doctors to spend the time necessary for true primary prevention. Medical schools need to spend months, not hours educating future doctors on nutrition, lifestyle management and counseling methods. We MUST stop the tremendous problem of polypharmacy- this is accomplishing nothing, and in most cases, creating more health problems for our patients.
— Brian Anderson
National University of Health Sciences
The ideal would be a creative, compassionate, and competent person. One that integrates technology to deliver forward thinking care. One that thinks outside of the box for solutions and...
— Abha Khandelwal
The ideal would be a creative, compassionate, and competent person. One that integrates technology to deliver forward thinking care. One that thinks outside of the box for solutions and individualizes treatment to the person. The reality with time pressures and lack of reimbursements is that we are moving towards checklist medicine which encourages the opposite. Further patients are pushing ownership and accountability of their health from themselves to their physicians. Until patients are not engaged and held accountable for their health and made to be part of the decision making a 21st century physician will fail. All of these challenges will be what that physician faces and keep them from meeting the ideal.
— Abha Khandelwal
Someone who listens and slows down. Doesn't order tests, shares research and best- practices. Talks to me about healthy lifestyle choices and preventative care vs. pills and medicine.
— Sarah Boyer
social worker- boston college
Someone who listens and slows down. Doesn't order tests, shares research and best- practices. Talks to me about healthy lifestyle choices and preventative care vs. pills and medicine.
— Sarah Boyer
social worker- boston college
Committed to prevention
— Philip Lederer
Committed to prevention
— Philip Lederer
Let's end performative compassion. Democratize the failures of our profession. Write what hurts for truth and reconciliation while reforming the payment system. One might call it "the vision...
— Maureen Miller
NYU Med/Harvard Public Health
Let's end performative compassion. Democratize the failures of our profession. Write what hurts for truth and reconciliation while reforming the payment system. One might call it "the vision thing." That person should drop jargon and treat patients as he would blog about himself.
— Maureen Miller
NYU Med/Harvard Public Health
Someone who: respects the dignity and humanity of every patient, recognizes biomedical limitations, tackles the hard issues of poverty and structural violence, collaborates with a diverse and...
— Nina Woolley
Someone who: respects the dignity and humanity of every patient, recognizes biomedical limitations, tackles the hard issues of poverty and structural violence, collaborates with a diverse and interdisciplinary team, actively fights injustice, continually strives for self-improvement
— Nina Woolley
Tomorrow's doctor must be an educator. With the phenomenal availability of information and growing interest in taking control of one's own health, I see a physician's primary role transitioning...
— Anita Grover
Tomorrow's doctor must be an educator. With the phenomenal availability of information and growing interest in taking control of one's own health, I see a physician's primary role transitioning towards helping a patient sift through treatment options and lifestyle choices. A physician's ability to communicate and partner with a patient and his or her family towards a common goal, while remaining at the forefront of medical literature, will begin to trump the medical pedestal of the previous century.
— Anita Grover
Focusing on preventive care & instilling in tomorrow's generation a more holistic view of health - thinking radically enough to ask how can a lifestyle of good food & physical exercise replace 90%...
— Nikhil Arora
Back to the Roots
Focusing on preventive care & instilling in tomorrow's generation a more holistic view of health - thinking radically enough to ask how can a lifestyle of good food & physical exercise replace 90% of most drugs out there. Focus on food, joy, and exercise as the "medical breakthroughs" of the 21st century.
— Nikhil Arora
Back to the Roots
The 21st century physician is someone who has an interdisciplinary approach to healing cognizant of the lifestyle ecosystem and behaviors of each patient. The 21st century physician will need to be...
— Nadir Shams
Johns Hopkins
The 21st century physician is someone who has an interdisciplinary approach to healing cognizant of the lifestyle ecosystem and behaviors of each patient. The 21st century physician will need to be an astute business-person in order to navigate the field of healthcare in America. Finally, the 21st century physician is someone who will need to be fully aware of the newest global technologies and pharmaceutical advancements to provide top-class care.
— Nadir Shams
Johns Hopkins
Someone who guides me towards becoming a healthy person - meaning fixing the *causes* of my illnesses - and who does so using modern processes to make my experience with them as effortless as...
— Sumeet Jain
Someone who guides me towards becoming a healthy person - meaning fixing the *causes* of my illnesses - and who does so using modern processes to make my experience with them as effortless as possible.
— Sumeet Jain
For questions email: doctor@tomorrowsdoctor.org.